case: (Default)
Case ([personal profile] case) wrote in [community profile] fandomsecrets2017-02-12 03:42 pm

[ SECRET POST #3693 ]


⌈ Secret Post #3693 ⌋

Warning: Some secrets are NOT worksafe and may contain SPOILERS.

01.



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02.
[Sherlock]


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03.
[Yu-Gi-Oh!]


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04.
[She-Ra Princess of Power Crystal Castle, He-Man Masters of the Universe Snake Mountain, He-Man Masters of the Universe Castle Grayskull]


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05.
[Tara Palmer-Tomkinson]


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06.
[Pretty in Pink]


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07.
[Crazy Ex-Girlfriend]











Notes:

Secrets Left to Post: 02 pages, 36 secrets from Secret Submission Post #528.
Secrets Not Posted: [ 0 - broken links ], [ 0 - not!secrets ], [ 0 - not!fandom ], [ 0 - too big ], [ 0 - repeat ].
Current Secret Submissions Post: here.
Suggestions, comments, and concerns should go here.

(Anonymous) 2017-02-13 04:07 am (UTC)(link)
"at least by fanfic standards" wow. you're really not making your case here. Writing is writing is writing.

(Anonymous) 2017-02-13 06:53 am (UTC)(link)
Not really, and if you weren't being willfully combative you would acknowledge that.

I mean, it's been pretty well established that even the best fanfic is often not conducive to being turned into original fiction. Because "good writing" by original fiction standards involves crafting the building blocks for the story and then crafting the story from those blocks, while "good" fanfic writing is free to skip over a large chunk of the first step and move right on to the second. In that regard, I will very rarely evaluate how well written fanfic is in direct comparison to original fiction, because the comparison is unfair to both modes of writing.

Among other things, Performance In A Leading Role is well paced and well developed, with snappy and effective dialogue, consistent and likable characterizations, and a nicely filled out ensemble cast. But would it stand alone as original fiction? Maybe, but not with flying colors. But since there are very few novel length fics out there that would make truly great stand alone novels without extensive rewriting, that's hardly a valid point of criticism where fanfic is concerned.

(Anonymous) 2017-02-13 07:33 pm (UTC)(link)
nayrt but...

Because "good writing" by original fiction standards involves crafting the building blocks for the story and then crafting the story from those blocks, while "good" fanfic writing is free to skip over a large chunk of the first step and move right on to the second.

IMO, this rather leads back to ayrt's point about the implication that "fanfic standards" are, shall we say, less rigorous than original fiction standards. So saying that something is "honestly pretty excellent, at least by fanfic standards" still sounds like a huge (and necessary!) qualifier to me.

(Anonymous) 2017-02-13 09:20 pm (UTC)(link)
So saying that something is "honestly pretty excellent, at least by fanfic standards" still sounds like a huge (and necessary!) qualifier to me.

I don't know about AYRT, but when I'm talking about how well written fic is I always make sure to clarify that I'm measuring it by fanfic standards. Whether I'm speaking about the best fic I've ever read, or a fic that I didn't like. I just think it's a qualification that needs to be made in order for everyone to know exactly how the work is being evaluated. And I do this for exactly the reasons that AYRT underlined in their comment. Different strokes for different folks, I guess. But having read the fic AYRT is defending, I'm definitely inclined to agree with them that it's a well written fic. Not the best Sherlock fanfic I've read or anything, but definitely one that deserved its ample popularity.