case: (Default)
Case ([personal profile] case) wrote in [community profile] fandomsecrets2017-03-14 06:47 pm

[ SECRET POST #3723 ]


⌈ Secret Post #3723 ⌋

Warning: Some secrets are NOT worksafe and may contain SPOILERS.

01.



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02. [repeat]


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03.
[Elementary, Sherlock/Fiona]


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04.
[Bucky Barnes]


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05.
[Clerks]


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06.
[Rumer and Scout Willis]


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07.
[George R.R. Martin, ASOIAF]









Notes:

Secrets Left to Post: 02 pages, 21 secrets from Secret Submission Post #531.
Secrets Not Posted: [ 0 - broken links ], [ 0 - not!secrets ], [ 0 - not!fandom ], [ 0 - too big ], [ 0 - repeat ].
Current Secret Submissions Post: here.
Suggestions, comments, and concerns should go here.

(Anonymous) 2017-03-14 11:05 pm (UTC)(link)
The general audience doesn't care about diversity and never has. That's why diversity has been so rare for so long. It seems like the producers wanted to introduce romance into his life and created a character that they hoped would interest the audience and be a believable love interest for him without retconning earlier seasons.

(Anonymous) 2017-03-14 11:11 pm (UTC)(link)
I think talking about in terms of a "general audience" is misleading and doesn't get at what we're really talking about and assigns a normative status to groups of people that's not warranted. It's not that the general audience doesn't care about diversity. It's that the majority of the American viewing audience is white, straight, cis, etc, and is fine with only seeing people like themselves on screen. Which I think is probably broadly true, but let's be honest about what we mean and not pretend there's any more validity to it than there is, you know?

(Anonymous) 2017-03-14 11:19 pm (UTC)(link)
It's not that the general audience doesn't care about diversity. It's that the majority of the American viewing audience is white, straight, cis, etc, and is fine with only seeing people like themselves on screen.
That's exactly what not caring about diversity means in this context.

(Anonymous) 2017-03-14 11:20 pm (UTC)(link)
Like I said, I think phrasing it as "general audience" assigns it a normativity and virtue it doesn't really deserve

(Anonymous) 2017-03-16 04:49 am (UTC)(link)
The issue isn't that they don't care. The issue is that directors are convinced that they do. As in honestly the general audience would take or leave a diverse show but directors are convinced that they would be repelled by it.