case: (Default)
Case ([personal profile] case) wrote in [community profile] fandomsecrets2017-07-15 03:52 pm

[ SECRET POST #3846 ]


⌈ Secret Post #3846 ⌋

Warning: Some secrets are NOT worksafe and may contain SPOILERS.

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Notes:

Secrets Left to Post: 02 pages, 48 secrets from Secret Submission Post #551.
Secrets Not Posted: [ 0 - broken links ], [ 0 - not!secrets ], [ 0 - not!fandom ], [ 0 - too big ], [ 0 - repeat ].
Current Secret Submissions Post: here.
Suggestions, comments, and concerns should go here.

(Anonymous) 2017-07-15 08:28 pm (UTC)(link)
Same anon, cont.

This is why I prefer totally new characters, versus hypothetically, "black Superman."

If you change the race or gender of a character, then it should mean something since those are significant traits. But there's no neat way to make it mean something except by having it be a major factor in changing the backstory or plot, and then you run into all the questions like, are you saying that due to the race changing, s/he couldn't have had the same one as before? Could black Superman not have been adopted grown up on a farm? If not, then why does this character have to be "black Superman" and not "a black guy who is superpowered" if you're going to change the plot?

On the other hand, if you swap them and nothing changes, that also doesn't make sense and raises the question of why did you bother to swap them?

(Anonymous) 2017-07-15 08:31 pm (UTC)(link)
I don't understand why you're treating all of these things as being mutually exclusive. There are, in fact, approximately a million different possible stories about black guys who are superpowered. The story about black Superman is legitimate, and so is the story of a black guy who is superpowered. They're both fine and good.

(Anonymous) 2017-07-15 08:32 pm (UTC)(link)
I don't understand your argument. Could you clarify what you are arguing against, or what you think I am saying?

(Anonymous) 2017-07-15 08:40 pm (UTC)(link)
It seems to me that you're setting up an opposition between making totally new characters and doing race/gender swapped versions of existing characters. Criticizing the idea of race/gender swapped versions of characters on the grounds that they should be totally new characters instead.

But I don't think any opposition exists between those things. They're just two different approaches. To take the example of superpowered black guy stories - you can have a story that's about a new character who's a superpowered black guy, and you can have a story about a black version of Superman, and both of those things are fine. They're different stories that do different things. Making a story about black Superman is not worse than doing a story about a new character. Both stories are valid and can be worth telling if you want to tell them.

Like, all of these things you identify as reasons you should do a new character instead of a gender or race swap - those can actually be good reasons to do a gender or race swapped character. Because answering those questions can actually be really interesting and shed a new light on the character. I just don't see why it's presented as an either-or.

(Anonymous) 2017-07-15 08:45 pm (UTC)(link)
No. That is why I put "Same anon, cont." at the top of my second comment. It is an extension of the thing I was saying in the first one.

Here is what I am saying, condensed.

1. Gender swaps are hard to write and generally disliked because they tend to fall into two categories:
a) nothing but gender changes and everything else remains the same, which raises the question, why change it?
b) the gender change becomes the basis for all the plot changes, which runs high risk of it either being stereotypical or reading like the author's political statements and views on gender

2. Race swaps have the same pitfalls:
a) nothing but race changes and everything else remains the same, which raises the question, why change it?
b) the race change becomes the basis for all the plot changes, which runs high risk of it either being stereotypical or reading like the author's political statements and views on race

3. Gender and race swaps that do not fall into either of those two categories and become different characters with only passing resemblance to the original and the original's name slapped on top begin to drift away from X-swap and become totally new characters, which raises the question, why keep the name and insist it's a swap?

These questions are why it is hard to write "swaps" that are both good and remain "swaps." I don't know what you are talking about with the rest of what you are saying.